Dr. Seuss Field Day- Station 12

Station 12- The Lorax vs the Once-lersI recently learned about an awesome Dr. Seuss-inspired field day planned and organized by Patti, an elementary school PE teacher. Here is one of her 21 stations:

Station 12

Title: The Lorax vs. The Once-lers”

Skills: agility, gross motor

Description: Scatter at least 40 Frisbees (representing the Truffula Trees) inside the playing area (white square) with half of the Frisbees lying top side up and half of the Frisbees lying bottom side up(looks like a bowl) up. In this event there are 2 groups ­ the Lorax (representing Truffula Trees getting planted or picked up) and the Once-lers (representing Truffula Trees getting chopped or knocked down). One group will wear pinnies to distinguish between the two groups. On the signal to begin, the Once-lers job will be to flip each Frisbees that is lying top side  up over to look like a bowl and the Lorax’s job will be to flip each Frisbees up (so it does not look like a bowl. They will run from Frisbees to Frisbees to do their jobs. Volunteers will stop play after 1 minute to change how they are moving. For example, after the first minute they will walk backwards, and after the second minute is up they will skip. The volunteers should then change the student’s job with the Lorax (up) now becoming a Once-ler (down). Let them run again, then hop, and slide. This event will continue until time has been called.
**Note: Do not allow students to use their feet to kick over Frisbees. Only hands may be used to flip the Frisbees over and put them up.

Dr. Seuss Field Day- Station 9

Station 9- Horton Hears A WhoI recently learned about an awesome Dr. Seuss-inspired field day planned and organized by Patti, an elementary school PE teacher. Here is one of her 21 stations:

 Station 9

Title: Horton Hears A Who

Skills: gross motor, fine motor, eye/hand coordination

Description:  Students will be divided into 5 teams with the first person from each team standing inside a starting hoop with a pair of chopsticks in their hand. On the signal to begin, these players must power walk to the pile of “Who’s” in the hula-hoop. K, 1st and 2nd graders can use both hands with the chopsticks to pick up a Who and power walk back to the beginning hoop. 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders may only use one hand with the chopsticks (they have to put the other hand behind their back) to pick up a Who and power walk back the beginning hoop. Students from all grades then place the Who in the bucket and pass the chopstick to the next person in line. Teams will continue to go until time has been called.

Dr. Seuss Field Day- Station 8

Station 8- I'm Not Going To Get Up TodayI recently learned about an awesome Dr. Seuss-inspired field day planned and organized by Patti, an elementary school PE teacher. Here is one of her 21 stations:

 Station 8

Title: I Am NOT Going to Get Up Today!

Skills: gross motor, team work

Description:

“I Am Not Going To Get Up Today”
“You can pour cold water on my head
But you’re wasting your time.
So go away!
I am NOT going to get up today!”

 Divide students into 5 equal teams with the first person from each team standing inside a starting hoop. On the signal to begin, these players pick up a sponge from the trashcan filled with water. The must pass the sponge over their head to the next person in line. The players continue passing the sponge over their heads until it gets to the last player in line. The last person squeezes the sponge into a bowl then this person will take the sponge back to the front of the line, dunk the sponge in the trashcan and begin passing it over their heads again. Teams will continue to go until time has been called. The team with the most water in the bowl wins.

Paper Airplane Targets

I recently worked with an after-school program full of kindergarten boys who loved paper airplanes. the only problem is that they weren’t super great at making airplanes that flew far. They got discouraged with their airplane after throwing it a few times and seeing it land only a few feet away. So, they’d grab more paper and try again (folding it the exact same way). So the cycle would repeat itself until all the paper was gone. This seemed like a waste of paper to only use the airplane for 3 throws, so I decided to see what I could do to help these little guys appreciate their little planes, even though they didn’t fly very far. I used chalk to draw a line from which to throw the planes, and shapes on the ground with point values written inside. I taught the boys how to take turns throwing their planes from the line  to see if they could hit a specific target. Since they were little, they didn’t care about the total points they earned, but had a blast seeing who could land on the targets with 100 points.

paper airplane targets

I made sure to have plenty of targets and many that were only a few feet away so the kids with wacky-folded planes would be able to participate. The boys were much more entertained. Mission accomplished!

 

Dry, Dry, Wet! (Outside Water Game)

This game is a fun twist on the classic game, “duck, duck, goose!” Here’s the twist: instead of tapping other player’s heads, the person walking around the circle holds a wet sponge over each player’s head and says “dry, dry, dry…” until they come to the person they would normally call “goose.” Instead, however, the person holding the sponge wrings out the sponge over the person’s head, and thus the chasing begins.  Players get pretty wet, which is nice for a hot say. For the sake of good health, don’t let the sponge touch anyone’s head or the ground. Using a big sponge is usually best, so the person walking around the circle with the sponge will still have water to wring out on someone’s head, even if they go around the circle more than once. Enjoy!

dry dry wet

Switch! (The fun and easy playground game)

I just learned a new game today and I’m really jazzed about it. It’s called Switch, and here’s what you need to know:

  • 5 players at a time, everyone else in a line waiting to come into the game
  • Need a 4 square shape on the ground (basically looks like a huge 4 pane window)

First, players stand at the corners of the window and at the intersection in the middle. The 4 players on the outside corners try to run and switch places with each other. The person standing at the center intersection tried to get one of the corner spots while the others are switching. If the players on the corners make 3 switches, the person in the middle is bumped out and a new player enters the game (standing at the center). If the center player succeeds in stealing one of the corner spots, the player who lost their spot is out, the center person claims the corner spot, and a new player comes into the center.

Why I love this game: 1.) There’s no equipment necessary! Many schools have these 4 square lines painted on the ground already, but it’s as easy as getting some chalk if you don’t.  2.) Anyone can play. The group I was playing with today had kids ranging from kindergarten to 5th grade and we were all playing happily together.

Switch playground game copy

The player on the far right sat down to tie her shoe, but other than that, this gives you a decent picture of how players should stand. The boy in the white shirt is trying to steal a corner spot during a switch.