Google Voice Typing Tool

Google has a tool that will turn your spoken dialogue into written text on Google tools. This can help ALL grade levels.
Ways to Use this Tool:
– ESL Students who can speak English (not write) can communicate in a written way
 – Anecdotal note-taking for behavior tracking
– Record student’s spoken explanations

How it Works:
Open a document in Google Docs.
Click the “Tools” button: Voice typing. …
When you’re ready to speak, click the microphone that pops up on the left side of the page. Speak clearly, at a normal volume and pace.
To end the voice typing, simply click on the red microphone again.
Here’s an article explaining more (and image source).
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Don’t Eat Pete Board – St. Patrick’s Day

I’m pretty fond of this new Don’t Eat Pete board (updating my collection here!). I think it turned out nicely, so I wanted to share with you! Perfect for any St. Patrick’s Day party, this would work perfect with Lucky Charm cereal or rainbow Skittles for the treats!

Click here to download the PDF: Dont Eat Pete Board – St Patricks Day

Here’s how to play Don’t Eat Pete:

3 – 10 kids sit around the game board. The adult or moderator puts a small treat (M & M, chocolate chip, Cheerio, or whatever) on each number. The “guesser” leaves the area so they can’t see or hear what’s going on. Another person points to a number to choose “Pete”. The “guesser” comes back and starts taking the M & M’s (or whatever) off the board and gets to eat them. When the guesser touches “Pete”, everyone yells, “Don’t Eat Pete!!” and the guesser’s turn is over. The guesser eats the last one he got called out on to keep it sanitary!

Click here to see my other Don’t Eat Pete posts!

Adjectives Review (3rd Grade)

This is a quick worksheet I have used with my third graders for a review of adjectives.  I use this as one of my quick reviews when my kids come in from lunch or special area classes to help them quickly focus and be ready for our next activity.  I put it on their desk before they come back in the classroom, so they know to quickly get to work.  I’ve put two copies on a page so you can use half the paper.

Click here to download the free PDF: Adjective review – Little Red Riding Hood

 

Click here to view more grammar freebies!

Don’t Eat Pete – Most-Requested Kid Game in My Classroom!

This game has been a classic in my classroom, so it’s worth talking about again.  I have used Don’t Eat Pete for holiday parties for years.  I change the “game board” to fit the holiday with stickers or cutouts.  It takes about 5 minutes to make.  Get a colored piece of paper.  Mentally divide the paper in 9 squares – 3 rows and 3 columns.  Put a sticker or cutout in each “square”.  Number the stickers or cutouts 1 to 9.  Laminate it if you want it to last, or put it in a sheet protector.  Now you are ready to play.  3 – 10 kids sit around the game board.  The adult or moderator puts an M & M, chocolate chip, Cheerio, or whatever on each sticker. the “guesser” leaves the area.  Another person points to a number.  That number is “Pete”.  The “guesser” comes back and starts taking the M & M’s (or Cheerios, or whatever) off the board and gets to eat them.  When the guesser touches “Pete”, everyone yells, “Don’t Eat Pete” and the guesser’s turn is over.  The guesser eats the last one he got called out on to keep it sanitary!  My kids request this activity every party! My own kids at home have loved this too!
Here’s a photo of the Valentine’s Day one I have. As you can see, it doesn’t have to be crazy fancy or “Pinterest worthy” to be super fun.
Maybe I’ll try and make you some printable Don’t Eat Pete boards…

Paper Plate Heart Wreath Written Directions for Centers

The “paper plate wreath” as an art project has been around for decades. I found these directions in my mom’s teaching files from when she taught second grade thirty years ago (even before the internet and Pinterest!)  These easy to follow directions can be posted at a center when kids are done with work as incentive. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Click here to download the PDF:  Paper Plate Heart Wreath – written directions for centers

New Resource! Character Building and Classroom Culture Materials

I recently discovered a new resource I want to share with you! It’s a blog called Come Follow Me FHE (FHE stands for “family home evening,” where your family spends time together at home). Each week, kindergarten teacher, Angie, shares a short lesson about a character-building type topic and includes printables and activity ideas aimed at children.

The lessons are based off of a manual called Come Follow Me, which focuses on the New Testament. If sharing ideas from a religious topic is inappropriate in your school, use the basic ideas of good character to strengthen your students. For example, her second week lesson focuses on the Beatitude. Rather than calling them the Beatitudes, call them “character bees” or say “we should be humble”. I firmly believe these Christian values are critical to good character development in children and will strengthen us as a society.

Here’s a freebie she sent me from week 2: bee coloring page

I also liked week one, with the theme “we are responsible for our own learning.” This. Yes! A thousand times yes!! I went to the manual (available here) and found this lesson idea (I’ve modified it to fit a classroom setting):

Matthew 13:1–23  One great way to help [your classroom] prepare to learn this year is to review the parable of the sower. Your [class] might enjoy looking at different kinds of ground near your home to visualize the types of ground described in the parable. What can we do to cultivate “good ground” in our [classroom]? (Matthew 13:8).

This analogy lends itself to all kinds of discussions. “Our mind is like a garden” or “plant good ideas in our heads” and the list goes on…

Here’s his you get the freebies: Subscribe to the Come Follow Me FHE weekly email. I don’t like to give out my email or subscribe to things (I already get so much email!), But this one is a simple once a week email sent on Tuesdays. I’ve tried it and I don’t get a bunch of useless junk emails. If you missed the previous week’s worth of lessons and activities, you can get them at Angie’s Etsy shop. She’s got cute display printables for each lesson if you like pretty things!

New Year Reflections Spinner

I found this in my files and thought I’d share. This would be a great activity for a family or staff party and there’s little prep needed. I’m not sure where this is from, so if it’s yours, please let me know so I can credit you. Thanks and happy new year!

Click here to download: New Year Reflections Spinner

Using Essential Oils in the Classroom (Guest Post #2)

I’m sure you’ve heard about essential oils. I’ve wanted to learning about how they can be used in the classroom, so I reached out to a friend of mine who is very involved in the “oils community.” (If you’re familiar with Young Living Essential Oils, you’ll know my friend by the name, Lucy Libido. She’s written essential oils books for women and babies/kids) She connected me with a few teachers who use oils in the classroom. They have agreed to share their experiences with oils in a few guest posts. So here’s the second post about oils, written by preschool teacher, Nanette. Please note that she discussed the use of oils with the parents of her students. Click here to get started with your own oils kit!

As a preschool teacher of 19 years, I have always taken pride in looking for the best materials and items I can provide for my kids in the classroom.  When I discovered Young Living Essential Oils in 2016, I decided it was time to incorporate these oils in my classroom. Our director had already begun using Thieves Household Cleaner for our everyday cleaning needs throughout the preschool.  I communicated with the families in our classroom that we would like to introduce essential oils and asked if any of them had any questions or concerns.  Many of them had questions and concerns regarding the use of essential oils around their kids.  I was able to put their mine at ease that this would benefit their child’s preschool experience.  I began to introduce the oils that they were probably more familiar with, such as Peppermint, Lavender, Orange, and Lemon.  Once we had been diffusing oils for a while in the classroom, I introduced additional oils, such as Thieves, Cedarwood, Sleepyizes, Purification, and Lemongrass.  I may eventually add more oils, but these ones seem to be meeting our needs.

Daily, we use Thieves Household Cleaner to clean our tables, floors, bathrooms, windows, cots, and any other surface that needs cleaning.  We also diffuse oils on days that we feel it is needed.  This may be during moments when unique smells occur (which can be quite often in a preschool), when the class seems to need an energy boost (which usually occurs without help from oils), when nap time comes around, and the class needs to slow down, or just to add a nice smell to the classroom.

Our preschool will continue diffusing oils and cleaning with Thieves Household Cleaner.  We know that these oils are the best, and that using non-toxic products is the only way to ensure that our children grow up in a healthy environment.

 

Want to try essential oils? Click here to get started.

About the Guest Blogger

Nanette Arnold I have been a preschool teacher for 19 years, a mentor teacher for 5 years, and am currently acting as a director for my center while my director is on maternity leave.  I have worked with children ages 6 months – 5 years old.  I have been using Young Living Essential Oils since December of 2016.  In my spare time, I can be found reading, playing pool, trying new foods, enjoying the outdoors, and spending time with my boyfriend, friends, and family.

 

Note: Content on this blog is not intended as medical advice.