Skip Counting with Pictures

Check out this awesome idea for practicing skip counting or number sequencing. Put the picture together by putting the sequence in the right order. You can do this with any picture, but the ones we used were from a calendar. Here are the steps (steps 1 and 2 can be done in either order, but this is probably the best):

Step 1: Put numbers on the bottom of your picture. We put them on dot stickers first so we could easily tell which belonged to each set (example – yellow dots all belong to the same set). You could just write them on the bottom with a permanent marker if you wanted to be faster. Just make sure they’re easy to see against your picture.

Step 2: Laminate your picture. This step is sometimes so annoying, but it will definitely help your project will last longer!

 

Step 3: Cut your picture into strips, making sure there’s only one number on each strip.

Step 4: Enjoy! This makes a good “fast-finisher” activity, since it is still kind of fun. Depending on the size of your finished picture, you can store them in baggies or envelopes. I recommend writing the number of pieces on the outside of your container.

Here are some skip counting ones we made:

Then we got tricky and did a few with fractions. Here’s one of them:

 

Click here to check out some other number sequencing stuff:
Before, Between, After – Numbers Worksheet
Holiday Number Sequences Worksheet

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Guest Post: Track the Weather with Weather Charts

Always changing and never predictable, weather makes a fascinating study for inquisitive young minds. Conduct a three-part study of the microclimate of your backyard, complete with charts on temperature, rainfall, and observed weather. Not only will your little meteorologist learn a lot about local temperature trends and rainfall frequency, he’ll also get some good practice in data collection, graphing, and how to describe his observations.

What You Need:

  • 3 sheets of light colored poster board
  • Ruler or straight edge
  • Markers
  • Outdoor thermometer
  • Clear plastic cup
  • Weather stickers (optional)

What You Do:

  1. Ask your child to draw a large graph on each sheet of poster board. He’ll use one graph to track temperature, one to track rainfall, and one to record the weather (sunny, partly cloudy, etc.). Have him title each graph accordingly. Example titles: “June Rainfall,” “June Temperatures,” and “June Weather.”
  2. Before starting the study, help him figure out what kind of graph would best fit each chart. Ask him to think about the kind of data he’ll be collecting for each chart and how he’ll report that data. If he has trouble choosing, suggest a bar graph for the rainfall chart, a line graph for the temperature chart, and a simple table for the weather chart.
  3. Prepare the rain collection cup. Help him clearly label the clear plastic cup with half inch dashes to make it easier to measure the rain each day.
  4. Now conduct the study. Place the thermometer in the yard or directly outside the house where it will get accurate readings. At the same time each day for one month, have your child read the temperature on the thermometer and record it on his graph.
  5. For the rainfall study, ask him to set the plastic cup in an open space away from any awnings or overhangs. Each day it rains, ask him to check his rain collection cup and record how many inches of rain fell that day on the rainfall chart.
  6. For the weather study, encourage him to observe the weather each morning and draw what he sees (sunny, partly cloudy, cloudy, rainy, windy, etc.).
  7. At the end of the month, look over his completed weather charts and talk about how the weather varied over the course of the month and how he thinks the weather this month compares to weather in other months.

The study doesn’t have to end here! Make weather charts for subsequent months for a more in-depth study of local weather patterns.

(Post by Greg from Education.com)

Equal or Unequal Parts – Math Printable

The concept of equal is critical to kids understanding of so many things in math. Here is a simple page I made to reinforce this concept. In addition to the concept, it also helps kids learn the vocabulary. The key is on page 2 of the PDF. Thanks for checking out my blog!

Click here to download the full size printable: 
Equal or Unequal parts

Let’s connect! Catch me on Pinterest, Facebook or Twitter! 🙂

St. Patrick’s Day Word Graphing

If you’re lucky, St. Patrick’s day will fall during Spring Break or on a holiday. If not, then you’re got to embrace all the green and pinching that is St. Patty’s Day! Here’s a simple page to give your students to acknowledge the celebration of Irish culture, while secretly (or not so secretly) practicing graphing. 🙂

Click here to download the full size printable: Sight Words Graphing – St. Patrick’s Day

Let’s connect! Catch me on Pinterest, Facebook or Twitter! 🙂

 

Shape Graphing (Beginner)

Shape Graphing stickerI recently found this worksheet I made forever ago. It worked well with basic graphing. . Have the kids color and count each shape. Then create a graph based on the number of times each shape appears. It has worked well to start with a page like this where the graph structure is there and they just have to fill in the grid. Once we get good at this kind, I start having the kids make the graph structure themselves. Sometimes I just cover the bottom half of the paper before I run copies. Then the students have to make the entire graph themselves. Easy-peasy!

Download the printable: I can graph the pictures SHAPES

Answers: 3 squares, 5 hearts, 7 snowflakes, 2 presents, 9 stars (total of 26 shapes)

Firework Even/Odd Number Worksheet

Firework Numbers stickerWhenever we have a family gathering (like Fourth of July that’s coming up!), I like to have something for the kids to do. Whether it’s a craft, new game, something to color or an educational page worth a candy, I don’t feel prepared unless I have something planned in case they don’t find something to entertain themselves. Check out this page. It’s super simple: just color the fireworks based on if they’re even or odd.

Download the PDF: Firework Numbers

Fraction Pictures (Pictures Only)

I recently found this cool fraction picture book in my mom’s old teaching files. I don’t have directions, but the pictures seem pretty self-explanatory. Using different common fractions cut out on different colored paper, students made a bunch of cool pages. Not bad for integrating math and art!

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This page (quick tips on how to cut out each piece) was also in the file:

20160311_161156If you wanted to allow for more creativity, you could have students cut out a bunch of the fraction pieces and let them make whatever they wanted. Then have them label the size of each piece and tell you the total whole pieces they used in their picture.

Create Your Own Holiday Number Matching Worksheet

Holiday create STICKER

Last year, I posted a Holiday Number Matching worksheet. I received a request to make a blank one for teachers to write their own numbers and specify what they wanted their students to match it to. Fractions, decimals, percents, fact families! There are infinite possibilities of number conversions!

Click here for the free PDF: Holiday Equivalents Matching BLANK FOR TEACHERS