Guest Post: Track the Weather with Weather Charts

Always changing and never predictable, weather makes a fascinating study for inquisitive young minds. Conduct a three-part study of the microclimate of your backyard, complete with charts on temperature, rainfall, and observed weather. Not only will your little meteorologist learn a lot about local temperature trends and rainfall frequency, he’ll also get some good practice in data collection, graphing, and how to describe his observations.

What You Need:

  • 3 sheets of light colored poster board
  • Ruler or straight edge
  • Markers
  • Outdoor thermometer
  • Clear plastic cup
  • Weather stickers (optional)

What You Do:

  1. Ask your child to draw a large graph on each sheet of poster board. He’ll use one graph to track temperature, one to track rainfall, and one to record the weather (sunny, partly cloudy, etc.). Have him title each graph accordingly. Example titles: “June Rainfall,” “June Temperatures,” and “June Weather.”
  2. Before starting the study, help him figure out what kind of graph would best fit each chart. Ask him to think about the kind of data he’ll be collecting for each chart and how he’ll report that data. If he has trouble choosing, suggest a bar graph for the rainfall chart, a line graph for the temperature chart, and a simple table for the weather chart.
  3. Prepare the rain collection cup. Help him clearly label the clear plastic cup with half inch dashes to make it easier to measure the rain each day.
  4. Now conduct the study. Place the thermometer in the yard or directly outside the house where it will get accurate readings. At the same time each day for one month, have your child read the temperature on the thermometer and record it on his graph.
  5. For the rainfall study, ask him to set the plastic cup in an open space away from any awnings or overhangs. Each day it rains, ask him to check his rain collection cup and record how many inches of rain fell that day on the rainfall chart.
  6. For the weather study, encourage him to observe the weather each morning and draw what he sees (sunny, partly cloudy, cloudy, rainy, windy, etc.).
  7. At the end of the month, look over his completed weather charts and talk about how the weather varied over the course of the month and how he thinks the weather this month compares to weather in other months.

The study doesn’t have to end here! Make weather charts for subsequent months for a more in-depth study of local weather patterns.

(Post by Greg from Education.com)

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Sight Words Graphing

There’s nothing like killing 2 birds with one stone! I feel like this printable does that, so I’m pretty jazzed. First, kids read the sight words (clearly a win!), then they use the quantity of each word to make a simple graph (win-win!). Might be a good whole class activity or a page to send home and do as a “parent-student” practice. It’s very similar to the page I made for St. Patrick’s Day! Enjoy!

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Poetry Review Graphic Organizer

Confession… I’m not crazy about poetry. I usually prefer stories. Sometimes I feel like teachers go way overboard in dissecting poetry. This graphic organizer guides my poetry reviews. We go over enough that the kids think about the poem, but we’re not beating a dead horse. Maybe you’ll find it useful too. Enjoy!

poetry-review-graphic-organizer-previewClick here to download the full size PDF:  poetry-review-graphic-organizer

 

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6 No-Prep April Fools Day Pranks For Teachers

I’m bummed that April Fools Day 2017 falls on a Saturday. But if you’re one of those teachers who still has to pull a prank on your students, here are some ideas I’ve found. Also check out my ideas from previous years!

No Prep

Make a word search that has none of the words in it. Or, for the no-prep version, use mine! Click here to download: April Fools Word Search.

Ask for an important assignment, form or permission slip from last week that you never assigned. (source)

Talk but don’t say anything! Move your lips like you are talking. See how long you can keep going (don’t laugh!). You can do that on April Fools Day, or the day before. Then on April Fools Day, hand out a pop quiz or a crazy hard assignment on what you “said.”  (source)

“[I] put a sign in my door that said please use other door. THERE ISN’T ANOTHER DOOR! Lol they loved it!” -Reader, Tami H.

 

Some Prep

“I often play Bingo with my Spanish I students as a vocabulary review. Instead of each student having a different card, I made enough copies of one card and then gave them all the same card. It took them a while to catch on, but when they did, it was quite amusing!” – Anonymous Reader

“I usually point out a running course for them that will take FOREVER to complete and then say they have to finish in 3 minutes. As soon as they take off running I yell, “April Fools!” – Reader, TeacherTim (source)

 

What have you done to prank your students? Comment below (no sign-in required)!

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Equal or Unequal Parts – Math Printable

The concept of equal is critical to kids understanding of so many things in math. Here is a simple page I made to reinforce this concept. In addition to the concept, it also helps kids learn the vocabulary. The key is on page 2 of the PDF. Thanks for checking out my blog!

Click here to download the full size printable: 
Equal or Unequal parts

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Color Word Butterflies

Sight words are key. Colors are usually some of the first sight words taught because they are are in so many worksheet directions! “Color this thing red if it blah blah blah” or “circle all of the blah blah blahs with green.” This page is just for learning those color names sight words. Easy-peasy worksheet, and kids will be able to do so much more when they know color words by sight!color-word-butterflies-preview Click here to download the full-size PDF: color-word-butterflies

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Prepositions Practice

Prepositions are really tough for English Language Learners. And sometimes you just don’t have time to prep or do the fun manipulative ideas you see on Pinterest. Here’s a quick (super self-explanatory) page that asks kids which preposition makes sense with the picture. On the key (page 2), the answers are in bold.

prepositions-preview

Click here to download the full size PDF: prepositions

Also consider choosing pictures from a story book, newspaper or magazine and ask questions about the pictures. Or, grab a small object and a student volunteer and create the Pinterest idea on the spot! Both are super easy to do off the top of your head and will continue to strengthen English language skills of all your students.

State Capitals Practice

states-capitals-practice-previewAfter you teach your kids the states and capitals (using the “Fifty Nifty States” song!?), you’re going to need a quiz. Or a practice page to make sure your kids can spell everything correctly. Either way, it’s pretty handy! The printable has two versions of the page to give students (one with the states listed and one with the capitals listed) and an answer key.

Click here to view the full size PDF: states-capitals-practice