TECH TIP: Get to Different G Suite Websites More Quickly

For quick access to the different google items, simply start typing in your browser the type of Google file you want to create or view. Google will pull up the rest of the website.

For example, if you want to see your Google drive, simply start typing: “drive“ into the browser, and Google drive will pull up. If you want to go to Google Classroom, start typing, “classroom” into the browser, and the page address will pull up.

Just think, now you don’t need to go to your email page, and pull down google options anymore!

These are the websites that your computer will be pulling up!

Google Drive: Drive.google.com

 

Google Docs: Docs.google.com

 

Google Sheets: Sheets.google.com

 

Google Forms: forms.google.com

 

Google Sites: Sites.google.com

 

Google Classroom: Classroom.google.com

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“Snapshot of Fall Break” Graphic Organizer

Thank heavens for fall break! It can’t come soon enough and it never lasts long enough! At least you can have an easy way for everyone to share their fall break adventures with this easy printable! Have your students write or draw something to answer each prompt.

Click here to download the PDF: Snapshots of Fall Break

 

Tech Tuesday: Free Resource for English Learners in Your Classroom

Lauralee is now a technology coach in her district. Here is a helpful resource for English Learners (and every student!) in your classroom!

If you have students who are struggling with your tier one (whole class) instruction because they don’t understand the challenging English vocabulary, then Quizlet is a great FREE website for you. It is a wonderful resources that will help your student learn some of the important vocabulary words before you use them in class. By front-loading your EL students with the vocabulary prior to a lesson, they will better be able to follow along during the lesson and understand the content discussed. It’s so easy to access, requires VERY little prep, and the students don’t even need accounts!

 Just follow these simple steps:
2. In Upper left corner, use search bar to type in content area. (For example: I typed in Space Spanish terms. See image below.)

3. Look through the results to find a set that fits your student’s vocabulary needs
4. Copy the link for future access
(You can get a free teacher account and create your own vocab sets also. Don’t have students get accounts until you look into your district’s student privacy policy to see if Quizlet follows the proper privacy!)

 

Here is an example of how I use Quizlet in my classroom: Let’s pretend that I am about to start my space unit in science. I have a student who doesn’t speak much English. Naturally, I am thinking about how to help this student get something out of my lesson. So, I go to Quizlet, and find a vocab set that has the words that she will be hearing. Then, I have her do the activities that go with that set of words before I start actually teaching the unit. When I do start the space unit with the whole class, that student has heard the words and is WAY more familiar with their meanings.
#ELhelp #EveryKidCounts #SetUpForSuccess #TechTuesday
P.S. I know it isn’t Tuesday yet, but I wanted to share this resource with you because there are so many helpful things on Quizlet!!

“Snapshot of Summer” Back to School Writing Activity

As an elementary school kid, I always looked forward to telling my classmates all the cool things I did during the summer. I also usually wanted to tell my teacher about my summer… and so did everyone else! Teachers can facilitate a mass “share your summer experience” activity with this simple (self explanatory!) page. Depending on your grade level, have your students draw or write about each of the 5 prompts.

Click here to download the PDF: Snapshots of Summer Break

Some students don’t have amazing vacation stories to tell, so I tried to include things that every kid can write/draw about (like “things I ate”) when I was creating this page.  Good luck on your first day!

Sneaky Leprechaun Word Swap (Context Clues)

Looks like those pesky leprechauns have done it again! Use the context clues to figure out which words the leprechauns have swapped out for silly ones.

Free printable for upper grades! Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Download the free printable PDF: Sneaky Leprechaun Word Swap with Answer Key

Click here for more St. Patty’s Day stuff!

Easy Halloween Costumes for Teachers

Halloween in school is nuts. Not only do you have to keep your students focused while they’re on a sugar buzz, but they’ll be dressed up like what’s his face from whatever that popular new show is. AND you need come up with a costume that’s cool (and totally appropriate for school). Just what you needed – another thing to worry about. Well, here are a few easy Halloween costumes for teachers that can be thrown together at the last minute (and when I say “last minute,” I mean, 2 days – 2 hours before school).

OPTION 1: Children’s Book Characters

Viola Swamp from “Miss Nelson is Missing!” by Harry Allard (source)

Camilla from “A Bad Case of the Stripes” by David Shannon (source)

 

Rainbow Fish from “Rainbow Fish” by Marcus Pfister (source)

 

Professor Trelawny from the Harry Potter Series by JK Rowling (source)

 

(If you feel the need to do a group costume)
Madeline, Miss Clavel and the girls from the Madeline series
by Ludwig Bemelmans (source)

 

Emily from “Clifford the Big Red Dog” by Norman Bridwell  (source)

 

The coconut tree from “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom”
by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault (source)

 

The Giving Tree from “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein  (source)

 

OPTION 2: Puns
I don’t need to caption these. They’re pretty self-explanatory!

(source)

 

(source)

 

(source)

 

Looking for more punny costumes? Try this list from Buzzfeed.

Also check out my Halloween free printables! Click here!

Happy Halloween!

Close Reading Trick – Side Loading Dry Erase Sleeves!

I received free products from Oriental Trading Company in exchange for sharing my thoughts on this blog.

Close reading is all the rage right now. My team and I have read several books about how to make it happen effectively. We specifically focused on the sign posts for close reading book. I recommend this book for 4-6 grade teacher.  After reading about how powerful close reading can be, I wanted to have my students mark up their pages with questions, comments, and symbols. I wasn’t very successful though because writing in textbooks is a big no no! People suggested sheet protectors and all kinds of things, but they don’t work with textbooks unless you rip out the pages.

I have finally found a solution! (Que the applause!!)

SIDE LOADING dry erase sleeves!I found these horizontal sleeves from Oriental Trading Company that slide on SIDEWAYS onto the page.   This is perfect because the kids can do all the marking with a dry erase marker, and then turn in the sleeve so I can look at it later.  It also leaves the textbook in tact and bound. I think this is a major win-win! Click here to check them out.

Please comment below if you’ve got other close reading tips! I’m always on the lookout!

Getting the Most Out of Ticket Jar

I received free products from Oriental Trading Company in exchange for sharing my thoughts on this blog.

As a teacher, I have found that the more positive praise I do, the less negative I have to deal with. One of the best systems I have used is my ticket jar system. Most people have probably heard of a form of this. I do ticket jar every Friday. It’s a good system for me because it can be individual incentive and group incentive. Here are 3 tips we’ve come up with:

All Roads Lead to Rome: At first it seems like I have tons of different positive incentives, table points, house points, class rock party points, class activity time points, individual tickets. It is true, but the beauty is that these “different” systems all come back to tickets. (That will make things so much easier on you as a teacher., I promise)

Here is an example: My students sit in tables. They earn points for their table by transitioning quickly, working well together during a project, all turning in certain assignments. At the end of the day, whichever table has the most points, each person gets 2 tickets.  (Table points convert to tickets!)

Another example: If I have an important paper that I need signed and brought back, I use tickets to bribe students to take it home, get it signed, and brought back. Works every time!

Let Ticket Jar Feed Itself: I encourage students to make donations of toys they don’t want or random items that their parents are willing to buy at the dollar store. When they make a donation, I give them a ticket just for donating. Also, I promise them that I will put their ticket back if I pull it on that item. Mindy didn’t do this her first year and ran out of cool prizes really fast. Then she had no budget (of course!) for replenishing it, so it didn’t have near the power to motivate her students.

Be Cheap: It can be expensive handing out things each week. Here are a few tips on that too:

  1. Get students to donate (as mentioned above).
  2. Collect “cool rocks” on all your vacations, hikings, adventures, whatever. I teach 6th grade and they are really into a neat rock!
  3. Oriental Trading Company: They have cheap bundles of items. You can buy big mixed packets or a specific item that you know will be a winner. I recently bought a huge bag of sticky hands for less than ten bucks and I am pretty sure it will last the whole year!
  4. Dollar Stores and Thrift Stores: Dollar stores often have packs of pencils or candy. Just figure out the unit price to decide if it’s a good deal! If you get something from a thrift store, make sure it is clean or better yet, still packaged!