Grammatical Poetry – Summer Activity for Kids

It’s that time of year… the weather’s getting warmer and the kids are getting really squirmy! Must be the end of the school year! But learning’s not over (it never really is, right?)! Here’s a summer-themed language arts activity for kids that reviews grammar and helps them create a poem about summer time! Click here for the PDF: Grammatical Poetry- Summer

Here’s what the page looks like:

Grammatical Poetry- Summer

Click here for more grammatical poetry!

Summer Memories Writing Project

Summer Memories- draw own picture STICKER

One of the best ways to preserve memories is to write them down. Help your students preserve a fun summer time memory be encouraging them to write it down. Encourage them to focus on details that help make the story rich. Motivate your students by allowing them to share their written memory with you, the class or other students. Here’s the free printable worksheet that goes with this activity. There are 2 versions (one provides space for your kids to draw a picture, and the other doesn’t). Click the links below to see the PDF: Summer Memories- draw own picture   or   Summer Memories- with picture.

Mask Art Project for Upper Grades

geometric maskThis project would have been SO COOL to try with my sixth graders! It’s a geometric paper mask that would be awesome when colored/painted. There’s a free printable and directions at this website. I would try it on your own first before attempting it with your class. Also, be sure to remind your students that they will only get one printable, so go slowly and carefully through the project. This project will definitely take more than one class period, so be sure to plan time for it and get a plan of how to preserve each student’s pieces in between sessions. In addition, make sure kids are proficient with using scissors first. This could be a cool end-of-the-year activity. These are so cool!

Telling Time Worksheets – Blank

Time telling STICKERAs standardized testing draws near, it’s time to review! I made this blank clock worksheet so I can draw in the hands to review whole hours, half hours, to the minute, etc. depending on the grade I’m teaching. When making materials, I try to make them transferable between grades when possible. I’ve made 2 whole sheet pages and a half-sheet.

Click here for the free, printable PDFs:
Bubble Time – Blank
Bubble Time 2 – Blank
Crazy clocks – Blank

BrainPop Educational Videos

If you’ve never heard of BrainPop, you’re missing out! It’s a cool internet resource with games, review videos and other stuff for kids. There’s a paid membership available, but you can find tons of stuff for free without it. There are many free, animated movies (available for all content areas) that seem to appeal to kids. many of the review videos include a cute story line and dialogue between Tim and his robot friend, Moby. Click here to view all the free BrainPop stuff

Awesome Test Prep Ideas

test prep ideasIt’s official. Test review season is upon us! Here are some ideas to help make your standardized testing prep a little less painful and more effective:

  • Play TONS of review games. Change up the teams frequently for the best results. Click here for a list of BOMBtastic review games!
  • Come up with a theme and a mascot to cheer you on. Use the theme in review games, certificates of achievements, rewards, etc.
  • Laminate station rotation tracking charts and have kids use overhead markers to track their progress through the stations.
  • Use your old benchmark tests as review questions for your review games.
  • Start a review system early on in the year, so your kids will not have to go as long between learning new content and the standardized test.
  • “Test prep does not always have to take place at a desk with a number 2 pencil in hand.  Instead, try having students answer questions in one of the following ways:
  • Label each wall in your classroom either A, B, C, or D. When reviewing answers, have students move to the wall labeled with the multiple-choice answer they chose.
  • Give students different colored pieces of paper or Popsicle sticks.  Each color can correlate to a multiple-choice answer (red is A, blue is B, etc.).  Have students hold up the color based on which answer they chose.
  • Turn your classroom into a museum by creating a gallery walk. Hang test prep questions around the classroom, students can move silently, in partners, or to music to the different “exhibits” around the room. They can then answer the questions on a worksheet or in a notebook that they carry around the room with them.” (Bottom four bullet points from Ashley, Teach For America)

Need more ideas? Check out my golfing review game or no prep Jeopardy.

Golfing Review Game

I recently saw this picture on Pinterest. I couldn’t follow the link very far, because I wasn’t a member of acvitityconnection.com, but I was inspired. Here’s my idea:

Set up: Make a box like this, with varying sized holes in the front. Smaller holes are worth more points. Then set it up in your classroom, with masking tape line on the ground, denoting where students should stand before they putt.

Game play: Group students for the review. Ask a review question, and have each team write down their answer. At the same time, have all groups reveal their answer. Any team who gets the answer right, gets to send 1 person to putt once to try to earn points. At the end of the game, the team with the most points wins!

I’ve tried numerous games like this with my 6h graders and they loved them! It disguised reviewing for the end of the year tests so the kids had a blast and we got through tons of math and science review questions!

Teacher Memory Book

Students love giving things to their teachers… everything from pictures of themselves to drawings of their family vacation. But after a while, teachers often end up with huge collections of things and they’re not sure what to do with them. Here’s one teacher’s idea: a memory book! She uses page protectors and a regular 3 ring notebook.

P1030580

Some years, she has had space for a bulletin board to display kids’ gifts before adding them to the book, but other years, she hasn’t had one so she just adds them to the book right away. She puts the memory books in her classroom library, where her kids love to look at things she’s saved from years past. What a great idea!